Field of Gum Sculptures
Field of Gum Sculptures

I like my physical actions to define my sculpture. I find the direct connection between the object created and its phenomenological relationship to myself ultimately makes the work less about me specifically and more about moments of shared humanity. I do what we all do.

Revealing the beauty underlying our actions is key.

If an echo is the reflected reaction to an action, we are our peripheral presence, not our matter but rather our wake. This passage is what I map. Intent conceals what I reach for, leaving only the conscious picture, not the self. Often the byproduct of creation is more “significant” then its intention.

These are the pictures of the self. The discarded clothes that reveal with Holmesian acuity the person who shed them.

August 24, 2016 at 9:30 AM I fell off a ladder and broke both my wrists. I would like to say I was 20 feet up but the truth is I was only on the third step. It took me about two years to recover most of my original dexterity.

With my touch back I started making chewing gum sculptures using only my mouth, teeth, palate, and tongue. These wads are my whimsies. Traditional whimsies are the playful ceramics created by production potters at the end of the workday. These fantastical mugs and pitchers have become collectible items.

When gum looses its flavor I free sculpt it in my mouth while trying to avoid running themes. These wads reveal how my mind plays. I have realized any odd wad is as valid as more carefully sculpted forms.

Making the glass vitrines gives me something to do while I use up the flavor. They also elevate my spittings towards respectability.

To date I have made over 150 gum sculptures. I don't particularly like chewing gum.

02_ARBORVITAE.jpg
03_BLUE BOAT.jpg
04_BRICK.jpg
05_FLOR RED.jpg
06_golden bird.jpg
07_golden disc.jpg
08_GREEN WASHER.jpg
09_HAMMER.jpg
10_SUGAR CONE.jpg
11_Intestine.jpg
12_ORANGE GOLDFISH_01.jpg
13_ORANGE GOLDFISH_02.jpg
14_STAFF.jpg
15_TONGUE.jpg
Field of Gum Sculptures
02_ARBORVITAE.jpg
03_BLUE BOAT.jpg
04_BRICK.jpg
05_FLOR RED.jpg
06_golden bird.jpg
07_golden disc.jpg
08_GREEN WASHER.jpg
09_HAMMER.jpg
10_SUGAR CONE.jpg
11_Intestine.jpg
12_ORANGE GOLDFISH_01.jpg
13_ORANGE GOLDFISH_02.jpg
14_STAFF.jpg
15_TONGUE.jpg
Field of Gum Sculptures

I like my physical actions to define my sculpture. I find the direct connection between the object created and its phenomenological relationship to myself ultimately makes the work less about me specifically and more about moments of shared humanity. I do what we all do.

Revealing the beauty underlying our actions is key.

If an echo is the reflected reaction to an action, we are our peripheral presence, not our matter but rather our wake. This passage is what I map. Intent conceals what I reach for, leaving only the conscious picture, not the self. Often the byproduct of creation is more “significant” then its intention.

These are the pictures of the self. The discarded clothes that reveal with Holmesian acuity the person who shed them.

August 24, 2016 at 9:30 AM I fell off a ladder and broke both my wrists. I would like to say I was 20 feet up but the truth is I was only on the third step. It took me about two years to recover most of my original dexterity.

With my touch back I started making chewing gum sculptures using only my mouth, teeth, palate, and tongue. These wads are my whimsies. Traditional whimsies are the playful ceramics created by production potters at the end of the workday. These fantastical mugs and pitchers have become collectible items.

When gum looses its flavor I free sculpt it in my mouth while trying to avoid running themes. These wads reveal how my mind plays. I have realized any odd wad is as valid as more carefully sculpted forms.

Making the glass vitrines gives me something to do while I use up the flavor. They also elevate my spittings towards respectability.

To date I have made over 150 gum sculptures. I don't particularly like chewing gum.

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